Tag Archives: Sensors

What is the difference between Consumer IoT and Industrial IoT (IIoT)?

19 Feb

Internet of Things (IoT) began as an emerging trend and has now become one of the key element of Digital Transformation that is driving the world in many respects.

If your thermostat or refrigerator is connected to the Internet, then it is part of the consumer IoT.  If your factory equipment have sensors connected to internet, then it is part of Industrial IoT(IIoT).

IoT has an impact on end consumers, while IIoT has an impact on industries like Manufacturing, Aviation, Utility, Agriculture, Oil & Gas, Transportation, Energy and Healthcare.

IoT refers to the use of “smart” objects, which are everyday things from cars and home appliances to athletic shoes and light switches that can connect to the Internet, transmitting and receiving data and connecting the physical world to the digital world.

IoT is mostly about human interaction with objects. Devices can alert users when certain events or situations occur or monitor activities:

  • Google Nest sends an alert when temperature in the house dropped below 68 degrees
  • Garage door sensors alert when open
  • Turn up the heat and turn on the driveway lights a half hour before you arrive at your home
  • Meeting room that turns off lights when no one is using it
  • A/C switch off when windows are open

IIoT on the other hand, focus more workers safety, productivity & monitors activities and conditions with remote control functions ability:

  • Drones to monitor oil pipelines
  • Sensors to monitor Chemical factories, drilling equipment, excavators, earth movers
  • Tractors and sprayers in agriculture
  • Smart cities might be a mix of commercial and IIoT.

IoT is important but not critical while IIoT failure often results in life-threatening or other emergency situations.

IIoT provides an unprecedented level of visibility throughout the supply chain. Individual items, cases, pallets, containers and vehicles can be equipped with auto identification tags and tied to GPS-enabled connections to continuously update location and movement.

IoT generates medium or high volume of data while IIoT generates very huge amounts of data (A single turbine compressor blade can generate more than 500GB of data per day) so includes Big Data,Cloud computing, machine learning as necessary computing requirements.

In future, IoT will continue to enhance our lives as consumers while IIoT will enable efficient management of entire supply chain.

Source: https://simplified-analytics.blogspot.nl/2017/02/what-is-difference-between-consumer-iot.html

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Critical (Outdoor) IoT Applications Need Robust Connectivity

14 Apr

It’s safe to assume that the majority of all Internet of Things (IoT) devices operate near large populations of people. Of course, right? This is where the action happens – smart devices, smart cars, smart infrastructure, smart cities, etc. Plus, the cost of getting “internet-connected” in these areas is relatively low – public access to Wi-Fi is becoming widely available, cellular coverage is blanketed over cities, etc.

But what about the devices out in the middle of nowhere? The industrial technology that integrates and communicates with heavy machinery that isn’t always “IP connected,” operating in locations not only hard to reach, but often exposed harsh weather. The fact remains, this is where IoT connectivity is potentially most challenging to enable, but also perhaps the most important to have. Why? Because these numerous assets help deliver the lifeblood for our critical infrastructures – electricity, water, energy, etc. Without these legacy and geographically dispersed machines, a smart world may never exist.

But let’s back up for a second and squash any misconceptions about the “industrial” connectivity picture we’re painting above. Take this excerpt from Varun Nagaraj in a past O’Reilly Radar article:

“… unlike most consumer IoT scenarios, which involve digital devices that already have IP support built in or that can be IP enabled easily, typical IIoT scenarios involve pre-IP legacy devices. And unfortunately, IP enablement isn’t free. Industrial device owners need a direct economic benefit to justify IP enabling their non-IP devices. Alternatively, they need a way to gain the benefits of IP without giving up their investments in their existing industrial devices – that is, without stranding these valuable industrial assets.

Rather than seeing industrial device owners as barriers to progress, we should be looking for ways to help industrial devices become as connected as appropriate – for example, for improved peer-to-peer operation and to contribute their important small data to the larger big-data picture of the IoT.”

It sounds like the opportunity ahead for the industrial IoT is to  provide industrial devices and machines with an easy migration path to internet connectivity by creatively addressing its constraints (outdated protocols, legacy equipment, the need for both wired and wireless connections, etc.) and enabling new abilities for the organization.

Let’s look at an example of how this industrial IoT transformation is happening.

Voice, Video, Data & Sensors
Imagine you are a technician from a power plant in an developing part of the world with lots of desert terrain. The company you work for provides power to an entire region of people, which is difficult considering the power plant location is in an extremely remote location facing constant sand blasts and extreme temperatures. The reliance your company places on the industrial devices being used to monitor and control all facets of the power plant itself is paramount. If they fail, the plant fails and your customers are without power. This is where reliable, outdoor IoT connectivity is a must:

  • With a plethora of machinery and personnel onsite, you need a self-healing Wi-Fi mesh network over the entire power plant so that internet connections aren’t lost mid-operation.
  • Because the traditional phone-line system doesn’t extend to the remote location of the power plant, and cell coverage is weak, the company requires Voice over IP (VoIP) communications. Also, because there’s no physical hardware involved, personnel never needs to worry about maintenance, repairs or upgrades.
  • The company wants to ensure no malfeasance takes place onsite, especially due to the mission-critical nature of the power plant. Therefore, security camera control and video transport is required back to a central monitoring center.
  • Power plants require cooling applications to ensure the integrity and safety of the power generation taking place. The company requires Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) networking for monitoring the quality of the inbound water being used to cool the equipment.
  • The company wants to provide visibility to its customers in how much energy they are consuming. This requires Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) backhaul networking to help manage the energy consumption taking place within the smart grid.
  • Since the power plant is in a remote location, there is only one tiny village nearby being used by the families and workers at the power plant. The company wants to provide a Wi-Fi hotspot for the residents.

From the outline above, it sounds like a lot of different IoT networking devices will need to be used to address all of these applications at the power plant. If the opportunity ahead for the industrial IoT is to  provide industrial devices and machines with an easy migration path to IP connectivity, what solutions are available to make this a reality for the power plant situation above? Not just that, but a solution with proven reliability in extreme environmental conditions? We might know one

Source: http://bigdata.sys-con.com/node/3766382

Smart cities to quadruple by the year 2025

4 Aug

The number of global smart cities is expected to grow from 21 in 2013 to an estimated 88 in 2025, according to a new report from IHS Technology. These smart cities will possess energy efficient infrastructures as well as keep a maintained focus on security and streamlined transportation efforts.

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Lisa Arrowsmith, IHS Associate Director, defines a smart city as a city that has deployed “the integration of information, communications and technology (ICT) solutions across three or more different functional areas of a city.” She further adds that these implementations could be in the realms of mobile and transport, energy and sustainability, physical infrastructure, governance, and safety and security.

Among the 21 cities IHS currently categorizes as smart are five in the U.S. – San Francisco, Los Angeles, Boston, Chicago and New York. According to the study, “Asia-Pacific will account for 32 smart cities of the total in nine years’ time, Europe will have 31, and the Americas will contribute 25.”

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“London, for example, is retrofitting both residential and commercial buildings to lessen carbon dioxide emissions,” the study notes. “The city is also adopting charging infrastructure to support the introduction of 100,000 electric vehicles.” In Santander, Spain, it adds, “soil-humidity sensors detect when land requires irrigating for more sustainable water use.”

The IHS report titled, “Smart Cities: Business Models, Technologies and Existing Projects,” also finds that the current $1 billion worldwide annual investment in smart cities will grow to over $12 billion by the year 2025. The report continues on to demonstrate the need for smart cities as a response to increasingly congested and polluted cities.

With a global population that is becoming overly urbanized, certain resources are becoming scarce in these densely populated areas. Smart cities and tech based city organization can focus on these limited resources and assure they are managed in a way that provides the best solutions for inhabitants.

While today’s smart cities may not be the most cost-friendly option when reorganizing an urban area, Arrowsmith lauds the possibilities that smart planning could provide. She notes the collaboration of public and private sectors could unquestionably boost a local economy. Incorporating technology applications into city planning could in turn create jobs or even foster a high tech culture within the municipality.

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The glowing example of a global smart city is Santander, Spain. After obtaining an EU grant, the aging port town organized a team to install over 12,000 sensors within city limits. BusinessWeek’s Carol Matlack writes that the sensors track everything from surfing conditions to traffic congestion. The city has even placed sensors deep in the ground of their parks to measure soil humidity and can then properly determine sprinkler usage. In all, Santander is a prime example of how technology and communication can work in unison to better organize the smart city of the future.

With the example Santander has provided as well as what plans for cities across the globe have in store, it’s certainly not far-fetched to believe in the projections provided by the IHS report. You can read the IHS document in its entirety here.

Source: http://atmelcorporation.wordpress.com/2014/08/01/report-smart-cities-to-quadruple-by-the-year-2025/

M2M to drive mass adoption of driverless cars by 2040

20 Sep

Driverless cars have previously only been seen in sci-fi tv and film, but could become prevalent in the real world in the future

Machine-to-machine (M2M) communication services are set to play a huge role in the role of transport according the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). The institute anticipates that by the year 2040, driverless cars — operated using M2M technology  will account for up to 75 per cent of cars on the roadworldwide.

Web giant Google became the first company in the world to obtain a licence for driverless cars, after the US state of Nevada passed a law in June 2011 to allow the operation of driverless cars in the state. Driverless cars operate through use of communicating sensors to ensure safe and efficient travel. Through vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communication there may be no need for traffic lights and stop signs when all of the cars on the road are driverless.

“Intersections will be equipped with sensors, cameras and radars that can monitor and control traffic flow to help eliminate driver collisions and promote a more efficient flow of traffic. The cars will be operating automatically, thereby eliminating the need for traffic lights,” said Dr. Alberto Broggi, IEEE senior member and professor of Computer Engineering at the University of Parma in Italy.

Travel on motorways would also change significantly with more autonomous vehicles on the road; autonomous and traditional vehicles would have their own designated lanes, which would help minimise traffic jams, increase efficiency and allow for faster speeds.

“Through use of dedicated lanes on the highway, it will provide more streamlined flows of traffic, which will make the transportation with these vehicles more energy efficient,” said Dr. Azim Eskandarian, IEEE Member and director of the centre for Intelligent Systems Research.

Such cars will also enable people of all ages and abilities to utilise these vehicles, thereby eliminating the need for having a driver’s license.

“People do not need a license to sit on a train or a bus,” added Eskandarian. “In a full autonomy case in which no driver intervention will be allowed, the car will be operating autonomously, so there will not be any special requirements for drivers or occupants to use the vehicle as a form of transportation.”

He added, however that the vehicles will need many more certifications in order to meet new standards.

Despite all of the benefits, driver and passenger acceptance are the largest barriers to widespread adoption of driverless cars.

“Drivers and passengers are hesitant to believe in the technology enough to completely hand over total control,” said Jeffrey Miller, IEEE Member and associate professor in the Computer Systems Engineering department at University of Alaska Anchorage. “Car manufacturers have already started to incorporate automated features, including parallel parking assistance, automatic braking systems and drowsy driver protection, to help people slowly ease into utilising driverless technologies.

“Over the next 28 years, use of more automated technologies will spark a snowball effect of acceptance and driverless vehicles will dominate the road.”

Source: http://www.telecoms.com/49482/m2m-technology-to-drive-mass-adoption-of-driverless-cars-by-2040/  September 19, 2012 Written by Dawinderpal Sahota

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